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Rooting?

  1. #1
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    Default Rooting?

    I'm curious about the importance of rooting since it maybe an option to avoid being infected by Stagefright. The released of Marshmallow made a chance to be secured from the comeback of a threat targeting Android devices vulnerability, which was called Stagefright 2.0. Since the threat targets the flaws found in the each Android Stagefright, the possible exploitation on devices features and even personal files is in danger. The threat is in a form of MP3/MP4 format that is sent through MMS. The worst case is that, once it was received, it automatically download itself causing an infection.

    It is said that the latest version Android Marshmallow has the patches that has the ability to secure the device. But unfortunately, not all Android devices can have this updated version. There goes the curiousity of how exactly rooting helps in this issue. Is it really useful to root your device to have an access and update to Marsmallow? Is it safe to have rooted device? What are the possible risk of rooting?

    Can anyone give some idea?

  2. #2
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    To start with risks, rooting voids your phone's warranty and if you're not having enough knowledge about rooting, a single wrong step can mess up the things. Rooting requires sufficient knowledge of what are you doing, and why. Many people end up downloading wrong package files or wrong recoveries and after flashing it, they end up hard bricking their devices and sadly, a hard bricked device can only be replaced if it's under warranty or you have to make a sacrifice.
    Coming to the positives, if you're running an older version of Android on your phone and you wish to run a latest version on it, you can flash a ROM based on your choices. But, you have to look whether a ROM for your choice has been released by any developer or not. The best place to search such stuff is XDA, Google it. Apart from this, you can make several customisation such as swapping internal to external memory, tweaking CPU, make regular nandroid backups, flash custom ROMs of your choice and the list goes on.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Adding to this, if ever you get your device hard bricked and it's under warranty, simply take it to the customers service centre and tell them that your phone isn't turning on and request a replacement. Never let them know about rooting and all this stuff.

  3. #3
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    Rooting has various merits and demerits too. You can root your phone within 30 seconds and without using your pc. But at times there are some risks involved while rooting like bricking which can make you phone unrepairable and useless.

  4. #4
    Silver Member pwarbi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waqsi View Post
    To start with risks, rooting voids your phone's warranty and if you're not having enough knowledge about rooting, a single wrong step can mess up the things. Rooting requires sufficient knowledge of what are you doing, and why. Many people end up downloading wrong package files or wrong recoveries and after flashing it, they end up hard bricking their devices and sadly, a hard bricked device can only be replaced if it's under warranty or you have to make a sacrifice.
    Coming to the positives, if you're running an older version of Android on your phone and you wish to run a latest version on it, you can flash a ROM based on your choices. But, you have to look whether a ROM for your choice has been released by any developer or not. The best place to search such stuff is XDA, Google it. Apart from this, you can make several customisation such as swapping internal to external memory, tweaking CPU, make regular nandroid backups, flash custom ROMs of your choice and the list goes on.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Adding to this, if ever you get your device hard bricked and it's under warranty, simply take it to the customers service centre and tell them that your phone isn't turning on and request a replacement. Never let them know about rooting and all this stuff.
    More and more people are rooting their devices these days though, so if you take it to an official repair centre they will check, and if the failure us due to rooting, it does void your warranty and they won't replace.

    Your better taking it to a local, unofficial repair shop and its not there concern and they'll just charge you to flash your IS and restore the device back to stock again, no questions asked.
    Rubie likes this.

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    So, it only means rooting is illegal, right? How does law takes an action with this? I'm just worried if I am caught rooting, am I going to be accused? But since rooting is broadcast online, maybe not. I even read an article that advised rooting just in case an upgrade is impossible because of incompatibility. It only means that rooting, in a way, has positive purposes.

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    Yes, you're rightI! Rooting helps you upgrade to new firmware when you're unable to take advantages of newly released Android versions. I don't know if it's illegal or not, but it helps users a lot. It voids the warranty of your handset, but still you can avoid this point if your phone is already running out of warranty.

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    I think its illegal because vioding a warranty is not a lawful act. But because it is not easy to detect who exactly does the upgrade through rooting, then no proof of evidence is presented.

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    Silver Member pwarbi's Avatar
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    While deliberately voiding a warranty is illegal going by the letter if the law, your not going to get prosecuted because the only person it affects is yourself.

    If you take it back to the official store they'll just say it's been rooted so we don't have to repair or replace it.

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    Your point is clear enough to say it's ok to root a device. I am not aware of such lawful abiding rules and act, so as to the possiblity of effect in rooting process, but because @pwarbi clarify me this information, I have known that as long as your not harming another, then there's no prosecution takes place. So in the case of rooting, voiding is done with a purpose so, personally its legal.

  10. #10
    Silver Member pwarbi's Avatar
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    I'm only talking about android here though, and an Iphone can also be rooted, known as jailbreaking it and Apple can be quite strict when it comes to any of their devices so I'm not sure what implications jailbreaking may bring.

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    My Tablet is now 3 years old and its beyond its warranty years and I am just rooted it to get rid of the annoying bloatwares installed on it. Thanks to rooting I was able to upgrade my system and it gives me the ability to install apps not compatible on my device anymore. I think you should only avoid rooting if you are still under warranty but we all know warranties have expirations. Once it is expired, You have nothing to lose.

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    Silver Member vinisouz's Avatar
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    Dangerous changes

    With root access you can change any system file. Perhaps this is the greatest benefit that leads many users to practice this procedure in their devices. However, it ends up being a double-edged sword. If you change any important file system, it can cause some damage that prevents the Android starts, getting stuck in an endless boot. In some cases it will be necessary to make a factory reset to recover the modified file, and others, will need to reinstall the whole system. Thus, modifying system files can end up being something dangerous for novice users.

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