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How do I install Linux?

  1. #1
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    Default How do I install Linux?

    I want to install Linux onto a Grub (GNU GRUB version 1.97~beta4)
    What is the best, up to date Linux OS?
    Where can I download it?

    Also I need step-by-step instructions on how to install it.
    I want to install from a disk 700MB. Will the download fit on the disk?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by doll View Post
    I want to install Linux onto a Grub (GNU GRUB version 1.97~beta4)
    Why GNU GRUB version 1.97~beta4 ? Any specific reason? My OS is Mandriva 2010.1 Spring the Grub version bundled is 0.97 !
    Each linux distro come with either GRUB ord LILO or both. We need not bother abut the GRUB version.
    What is the best, up to date Linux OS?
    Where can I download it?
    There is no definite answer as it upto the user's preference. For a good start you can try LiveCD version of Mandriva (KDE Desktop), Ubuntu (GNOME Desktop) there are many other enless list of such distros. Most of the LiveCD version will be bundled with basic software such as web browser, office, text editor, mail client, etc.[/QUOTE]
    Also I need step-by-step instructions on how to install it.
    I want to install from a disk 700MB. Will the download fit on the disk?
    You can try the LiveCD version without installing. Once you familiarize with you can install. Step-by-step instruction going to be different for each distro. All the LiveCD version will fit into 700Mb CD or can be made as USB key.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by doll View Post
    I want to install Linux onto a Grub (GNU GRUB version 1.97~beta4)
    What is the best, up to date Linux OS?
    Where can I download it?

    Also I need step-by-step instructions on how to install it.
    I want to install from a disk 700MB. Will the download fit on the disk?
    @doll:
    Did you work with LINUX up to now? Let me know, since it is matter.
    There are many distribution of linux and each one of them has its own usage, advantages and disadvantages. At the end it is the feeling of a linux user that tells which one of them can satisfy his needs.
    If you are new to linux, I suggest you to go for Ubuntu. You can just google it and you'll find its website easily.
    The reason I am suggesting ubuntu is, first, it is GNOME based ond Unity based. You can use any of these two environment which both are very user friendly and easy to work.
    Second, ubuntu forum and ubuntu community is fast developing and it finds the bugs available so fast. The members of ubuntu - compare to other linux distros - are more active and actual.
    and third, ubuntu uses software center that helps you to install major softwares visually with just a click. In another hand, codecs for audio and video which are a pain to linux users, is just a click far in ubuntu.

    I don't suggest KDE, for example kubuntu, if you are a new user of linux. KDE is a great distro, and so flexible and more complete than GNOME such. But sometimes, flexibility creates confusion. At the end the decision is yours.

    You should keep in mind that shifting from one operating system to another is quite hard. For example, I am an ubuntu user and sometime back I decided to give fedora 15 a try. It was hard to adjust myself with it and I required helps and new study materials. But I am pretty sure that I was much faster than a person whom just shifted from windows to linux.

    Installation of linux distros are almost same, with a minor differences. If you learn one, installing others are easy. You decide what distro you want to install; leave me a message here and I will help you step by step.

    Welcome to free world where is called LINUX.

  4. #4
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    Agree with everything there.

    The Ubuntu installation is just about as simple as a Windows installation. If you have enough space on your disc, it will use it without disturbing your existing Windows install, and then you can choose which system to boot.

    On the other hand, if you already have Linux knowledge, and you already know that it is actually better not to have just one / ("root") filesystem, but to have a separate /home filesystem on a different partition (equivalent to the C: drive thing with Windows) then the Ubuntu install will let you do that too.
    What is the best, up to date Linux OS?
    Probably contradictory requirements. You can always get Linux stuff hot from the developer's desk, but it may be an adventure in finding out what does and doesn't work.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick_H View Post
    if you already have Linux knowledge, and you already know that it is actually better not to have just one / ("root") filesystem, but to have a separate /home filesystem on a different partition
    Very nice tip. Actually it is good for a better space management as well as the security. Plus you can encrypt the /home filesystem which is gives an extra layer of security to your files in your computer.

  6. #6
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    Whilst the Ubuntu install is made really user friendly, I don' think it asks if you want separate file systems without going into the partition table. At this point, that requires going into the disk-partitioning software and telling it what is wanted. That is not the most difficult thing in the world --- but the absolute first-timer might be a little daunted.

    Someone who wants or needs real control over their disk layout might want (or need) to do some work even before starting the Linux install. For instance, a machine (especially a laptop) may have come with Windows installed on a C-Drive that uses the entire disk. Even if the C-drive has lots of "free space" there is nowhere to create a new Windows partition, or a new partition for a new operating system.

    The answer to this is the gparted live CD.

    Having downloaded this, and burnt it to a CD, next do your Windows housekeeping.

    download ccleaner and defraggler (from the same company). Use ccleaner to remove all the dross, then use defraggler to defrag and compact the data in the partition.

    For Gods sake: Back up your data to an external disk! Personally, I'd take an image of Windows with Drive Image XML.

    You can then boot up from your CD into Gparted, a graphical partition manager.

    The big deal here is that Gparted allows you to shrink a partition.

    Example... You have a 250Gb disk, and all of it is C: drive, but only 50Gb is used. You houseclean/defrag, then shrink that partition to 100Gb and you now have 150Gb that is really, really free.

    Gparted stores each job you ask it to do and does them all when you say "Go". Check the list carefuly, and don't be afraid to scrap it and start again. The mistake I made was what I thought was a minor size adjustment (using the mouse) turned out to be a move --- and it took hours.

    By the way: You can access ntfs (Windows) partitions from Ubuntu, but not the other way around, so you will still be able to access your docs, pics, music etc from both Windows and Ubuntu.

    Hope this is useful ... have fun (and back up your data first!)

    All software mentioned is free and easily found by Google.

    (Except Windows of course )

  7. #7
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    Default re:

    To install Linux, you follow a simple, step-by-step procedure that has three main phases:

    * Installing the operating system kernel and base system
    *Configuring the new Linux system
    *Installing applications

  8. #8
    Platinum Member puchu's Avatar
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    I don't know why but this person asked the question and then just disappeared .

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